Brooklyn Bridge Park – Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates

Brooklyn, New York Designers transform a defunct shipping complex and reconnect a city with its waterfront. By Sarah Amelar Slide Show Drawings Though they live surrounded by water, most New Yorkers have never touched the city’s East or Hudson Rivers. And while both rivers are tidal estuaries, their extensively bulwarked banks scarcely register such ephemeral events as rising and falling tides. Like many American cities, New York long severed much of daily life, particularly leisure activity, from direct engagement with its waterways. Visitors to urban riverside...

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Commentary: What Happens to Architectural Criticism When Bloggers Take Over?

 By Christopher Hawthorne In 1998, the British critic Martin Pawley rather dramatically announced what he called “the strange death of architectural criticism.” Pawley lamented the disappearance of an aggressive, “take-no-prisoners” approach to critical writing about architecture, which he felt was being replaced by “wall-to-wall testimonials of praise.” I wonder what Pawley, who served as architecture critic for both the Guardian and Observer newspapers and died in 2008, would say about the state of the field today, particularly in this country. If the praise, at least for...

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Top Architect, Once Rooted in the Sky, Comes Down to Earth

The Washington Post By Katherine Salant Unlike Frank Lloyd Wright, architect Peter Eisenman is not a household name. But within the profession, he is a global celebrity who has written or co-authored more than 20 books and appears on lists of the world’s top 10 living architects. His career spans more than five decades, and his provocative work is widely acclaimed for the ways it challenges conventional ideas about what buildings should look like, how they should function, and how we experience them. A professor of architecture at Yale, he has a doctorate in architectural history and...

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FAB: Stunning Prefab by the School of Frank Lloyd Wright

by Evelyn Lee view this image in original size ( 537 x 401 )     Frank Lloyd Wright meets modern day prefab in the stunning Mod.Fab home, developed by students at Taliesin West in collaboration with their Dean Victor Sidy and Inhabitat favorite Jennifer Siegal. The goal of the collaboration was to build a prototype prefab conducive to elegant and sustainable living within the heart of the desert landscape. It only took a single picture for us to become instantaneous fans, and from passive solar design to photovoltaic panels and SIPs we’re thoroughly impressed with the...

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For quake and tsunami victims left homeless, simple shelters help ease discomfort.

Shigeru Ban Offers Aid to His Native Japan By Naomi R. Pollock, AIA Photo courtesy Shigeru Ban Architects Emergency centers set up in gymnasiums and other large structures offer little privacy. In response, Shigeru Ban conceived a partition system made of paper tubes and canvas sheets.  “I have been to disaster areas all over the world,” says Shigeru Ban. But never had the Japanese architect and veteran relief worker seen the degree of devastation that struck his homeland on March 11, 2011. The 9.0-magnitude earthquake, followed by the massive tsunami that crashed down on...

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no Ya-Ya, people want architecture at a Great Value

A few months ago I began to contemplate the effect of the Great Recession on our profession and to define for myself the current, past and future status of architecture in the United States. There have been many movements and styles to evolve in architecture since the implosion of Pruitt-Igoe. It seems that since the death of Modernism that stylistic periods in architecture have increasingly become shorter and shorter, approaching a period of brevity in which we have to question whether or not we should even call these movements architectural styles. Today, architects are trading in their...

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